Modern and bizarre: Architectural marvels to see in your lifetime

Architecture is a major field of design that is also a massive and constantly evolving industry. A crucial aspect of real estate and urban planning, it is a major factor to determining a properties’ value and investment potential. Hence, many cities around the world are investing heavily in good design to attract not only property buyers but also tourists.

Man-made architectures have long reigned the list of wonders both in the ancient and modern world. To think that humanity can create something majestic by combining skills and imagination is a source of pride, a brilliant gift that can have the ability to nearly rival the beauty of nature.

If you’ve travelled enough places, you’d observe how modern architectural wonders have impressively attracted millions of people to countries and how these seemingly passive structures have actively interacted and conversed with their perceiving audience. If you are still yet to check them off your bucket list, here’s a glimpse of some of the modern world’s greatest architectural achievements that you should see in your lifetime.

 

Image source: ideasgn.com

The Shard in London, England

As one of the marvels of modern engineering and architectural design, ‘The Shard’ (also referred to as ‘the Shard of Glass’) stands 310 m to tip tall, with 95 stories that allow anyone to see the finest 360-degree city views of for up to 40 miles. What’s impressive is its exterior, which is covered by 11,000 glass panels.

 

Image source: oddcities.com

The Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao, Spain

Branded as the ‘greatest building of our time’ by the iconic architect Philip Johnson, Frank Gehry’s the Guggenheim Museum was inspired by different architectural styles: deconstructivism, expressionist, and contemporary architecture.

 

Image source: arup.com

CCTV Headquarters in Beijing, China

This building is known for its bizarre and seemingly physically impossible form, but thanks to modern engineering and the brilliance of its creators, Rem Koolhaas and Ole Scheeren, it has become one of the greatest architectural marvels that the world has ever seen.

The engineers described it as a ‘three dimensional cranked loop’ because of its unusual shape. What’s amazing is that, the building is also designed to withstand earthquakes and stand strong in frequent seismic activities.

 


REPOST: Algae-producing architecture a “future energy” highlight at Astana Expo 2017

Nowadays, ‘beautiful’ design is no longer just the sole basis of defining what good architecture is. At the Astana Expo, architects are finding new ways to integrate green energy and non-artificial elements (such as plants and natural lighting) in building quality structures. Here is an interesting feature from Daily Planet:

The BIOtechHUT exhibit at Expo2017 in Kazakhstan. Image ©NAARO

An urban “algae farm” producing low-carbon protein and bio-fuel is one of the highlights on show this week at the future energy-themed Astana Expo 2017 in Kazakhstan.

London-based EcoLogicStudio’s BIO.tech HUT is a three-part pavilion at the biennial world fair event, exploring the boundaries of biologically based architecture. The prototype aims to “probe the future, test scenarios and promote the emergence of a new narrative in future energy”.

Bio.light room

The first part of the exhibit, the Bio.light Room, is a dark space in which the only visible light emitted is from bioluminescent bacteria. The organisms absorb energy through photosynthesis in tubes that encircle the outside of the pavilion, lighting up the dark part of the exhibit when shaken and oxygenated.

Bio.light Room. Image ©NAARO

 

H.O.R.T.U.S. (Hydro Organisms Responsive to Urban Stimuli) room

Another room (H.O.R.T.U.S.) flooded with natural light, hosts an art installation containing photosynthetic micro algae. Visitors are encouraged to engage with the micro algae using carbon dioxide to produce oxygen bubbles in 700 meters of glass tubing (see image below).

H.O.R.T.U.S. (Hydro Organisms Responsive to Urban Stimuli) room. Image ©NAARO

 

Garden hut

A third area, Garden Hut, uses a high-speed air flow to lift algae into glass tubes, generating a stirring effect that allows the desired oxygen and carbon dioxide exchange to occur, before falling back with gravity. A pump isn’t needed, a method that the team thinks hasn’t been used in algae production previously.

Garden Hut. Image ©NAARO

 

Climate benefits

Five tubes containing different types of algae loop the exhibit, collecting in tanks for harvest as super-food or bio-fuel.

EcoLogicStudio estimates the hut can produce enough algae-based protein for 12 adults, the protein equivalent of eight cows. By switching to an algae protein diet, the overall net contribution to carbon sequestration of the BIO.tech HUT would be around 90kg per day — the same carbon sequestration potential of 500 square meters of forest.

The BIO.tech HUT can also produce about 1kg of bio-fuel a day, comprising either dry algae or oil produced by green algae — enough to power a north European home.

According to Marco Poletto, Director at ecoLogicStudio, it makes more sense for to produce food from the algae produced. To realise the ambition of bringing microorganisms into architecture, “in an urban environment you are looking to grow strains that have higher market value”, he said.