REPOST: How Architecture Should Adapt to Climate Change

With the planet’s climate rapidly changing, architects must begin designing homes and buildings with deeper understanding about weather patterns. This article published on TIME has interesting insights on this issue:

Ever since humans left their caves, providing shelter has been the focus of their architectural endeavors. Perfecting the art over time, we have come to think of buildings as permanent. When we build, we do it for eternity. Still, whenever disaster strikes, buildings invariably burn, flood or collapse. We have seen a lot of that in the news lately. Grenfell Tower, hurricanes Harvey and Irma and Maria, the Mexican earthquakes, to name a few. Confronted with the fragility of our structures — and the ever-growing power of the elements they face — we start asking questions, search for solutions and, inevitably, turn to architects for answers.

It can give one hope to see the hands-on interventions that architects have provided in the immediate aftermath of disasters. Some have turned shipping containers into shelter for evacuees and refugees. Others have transformed otherwise-disposable paper tubes into partitions in relief shelters and repurposed gymnasiums, into entire concert halls and churches. Several have built structures halfway so their future residents can complete them according to local needs. Still more have provided indoor play spaces for young children after nuclear plants melted down.

Architects have also been engaged in optimistic longer-term solutions. On the hurricane-exposed coast of the Atlantic, a group of architects has developed catastrophe-mitigation strategies that seek to work with the environment, rather than against it. (One team is led by OMA, the firm where I work.) Instead of reinforcing protection against flooding, they accept the reality of sea level rise and incorporate it into the design. Building is confined to safe areas, while vulnerable areas become buffer zones.

Though useful as they might be, the real effect of such ideas remains an open question. Certainly, they raise awareness of global catastrophic risk. But how are they to be applied in existing, densely populated urban areas — the way that now more than half of the world’s population lives? In the end, such projects mainly expose the deficiencies in the way cities have been planned, from a time when responding to climate change was not an issue. It will take more to address these issues than clever solutions devised by architects and other specialists. What is at stake is not so much how to find solutions in our struggle against the elements, but why we are at war with the elements in the first place.

Read more HERE.


These developing countries are building the most ambitious real estate projects of today

Real estate has always been considered one of the most vital sectors in every country’s economy and its growing importance has also made it a strategic investment option not only because of its ability in generating ongoing income sources but also how its value can rise overtime.

Since the decision of investing in particular real-estate projects depends on unpredictable factors such as the state of economy and government stability of a nation, a growing number of developers and investors have looked into building and investing in the most flexible, multi-use real estate projects recently – bringing their ambitions to the relatively calm and stable economies of several developing countries around the world.

Forest City, Malaysia (estimated cost: US$100 billion)

Image source: eco-business.com

Country Garden Pacific View (CGPW)’s new project, the Forest City in the Iskandar Region of the country is something that investors should look forward to.  In fact, the company’s CEO Baiyuan Su expects great things from this smart city, calling it Southeast Asia’s first and the largest multi-use green development project, covering an area of 6-million square meters.

The firm has also partnered with PCCW Global for a world-class, energy-efficient digital infrastructure by building data center solutions that will enable a future-proof digital framework for the green city.

Also included in the developer’s vision are digitized transport and utility management services and integrated communications solutions for its residents and businesses.

Eko Atlantic City, Nigeria (estimated cost: $6 Billion)

Image source: ekoatlantic.com

Started in 2009, the Eko trans-Atlantic city project was a practical and ambitious response to the region’s demand not only for commercial and residential accommodations but also for its growing tourism and business sector.

Developers have promised state-of-the-art technology, modern water systems and advanced transportation services, and an independent energy source.  Eko Atlantic City is already in its advanced stage of development and is considered the best, prime real estate in West Africa.

The project was made possible through the combined efforts of the Lagos state government and several private sectors including South Energyx Nigeria Limited.