More from: neo-futurism

Neo-futurism: A response to modern architecture’s skeptical designs

Since the Industrial Revolution and the boom of 20th century technology, mankind has witnessed changes that our ancestors would and could have never imagined to ever exist neither in their lifetime nor in the millennia to come. What was once impossible has now become a reality, thanks to the continued quest to simply see beyond and outside the box.

 

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Truly, many sectors and industries have benefited from the modern world’s innovative ideas as well as the ever developing technology, and the same story is true in the field of architecture—probably the single most important reason for the success (or failure) of many real estate and property development projects. Therefore, it plays a critical role in shaping up the business and the economy as a whole.

 

As a form of art that highlights a respect for structural and geometrical balance, it has expressed its own appreciation and genuine acceptance of what the modern world has to offer in the form of a “new” architectural style, neo-futurism.  Essentially, it is a late 20th century architectural style derived from high-tech architecture.  It combines concepts of urban design that utilize new materials and technologies. However, unlike its other modern counterparts, the style is more in touch with human emotions, promoting ethical values, and eco-sustainability.

 

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This is why neo-futurism is described as an idealistic and more optimistic take on the future. As a form of an avant-garde movement, it is as a departure from post-modernist’s skeptical and referential style in design. One of its goals is to rethink functionality and aesthetic in response to the rapidly developing urban areas.

 

Buckminster Fuller and other designers introduced this concept in the late 1960s and early 70s but rise of this art movement in modern architecture can be credited to prominent figures such as Zaha Hadid, Iraqi-British Pritzker Architecture Prize-winning architect, and the Spanish architect Santiago Calatrava.

 

Other famous neo-futurist figures are French architects Denis Laming, British artist Olivia Peake, urban-noise artist Joseph Young, and many more.