More from: real estate

These developing countries are building the most ambitious real estate projects of today

Real estate has always been considered one of the most vital sectors in every country’s economy and its growing importance has also made it a strategic investment option not only because of its ability in generating ongoing income sources but also how its value can rise overtime.

Since the decision of investing in particular real-estate projects depends on unpredictable factors such as the state of economy and government stability of a nation, a growing number of developers and investors have looked into building and investing in the most flexible, multi-use real estate projects recently – bringing their ambitions to the relatively calm and stable economies of several developing countries around the world.

Forest City, Malaysia (estimated cost: US$100 billion)

Image source: eco-business.com

Country Garden Pacific View (CGPW)’s new project, the Forest City in the Iskandar Region of the country is something that investors should look forward to.  In fact, the company’s CEO Baiyuan Su expects great things from this smart city, calling it Southeast Asia’s first and the largest multi-use green development project, covering an area of 6-million square meters.

The firm has also partnered with PCCW Global for a world-class, energy-efficient digital infrastructure by building data center solutions that will enable a future-proof digital framework for the green city.

Also included in the developer’s vision are digitized transport and utility management services and integrated communications solutions for its residents and businesses.

Eko Atlantic City, Nigeria (estimated cost: $6 Billion)

Image source: ekoatlantic.com

Started in 2009, the Eko trans-Atlantic city project was a practical and ambitious response to the region’s demand not only for commercial and residential accommodations but also for its growing tourism and business sector.

Developers have promised state-of-the-art technology, modern water systems and advanced transportation services, and an independent energy source.  Eko Atlantic City is already in its advanced stage of development and is considered the best, prime real estate in West Africa.

The project was made possible through the combined efforts of the Lagos state government and several private sectors including South Energyx Nigeria Limited.


Modern and bizarre: Architectural marvels to see in your lifetime

Architecture is a major field of design that is also a massive and constantly evolving industry. A crucial aspect of real estate and urban planning, it is a major factor to determining a properties’ value and investment potential. Hence, many cities around the world are investing heavily in good design to attract not only property buyers but also tourists.

Man-made architectures have long reigned the list of wonders both in the ancient and modern world. To think that humanity can create something majestic by combining skills and imagination is a source of pride, a brilliant gift that can have the ability to nearly rival the beauty of nature.

If you’ve travelled enough places, you’d observe how modern architectural wonders have impressively attracted millions of people to countries and how these seemingly passive structures have actively interacted and conversed with their perceiving audience. If you are still yet to check them off your bucket list, here’s a glimpse of some of the modern world’s greatest architectural achievements that you should see in your lifetime.

 

Image source: ideasgn.com

The Shard in London, England

As one of the marvels of modern engineering and architectural design, ‘The Shard’ (also referred to as ‘the Shard of Glass’) stands 310 m to tip tall, with 95 stories that allow anyone to see the finest 360-degree city views of for up to 40 miles. What’s impressive is its exterior, which is covered by 11,000 glass panels.

 

Image source: oddcities.com

The Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao, Spain

Branded as the ‘greatest building of our time’ by the iconic architect Philip Johnson, Frank Gehry’s the Guggenheim Museum was inspired by different architectural styles: deconstructivism, expressionist, and contemporary architecture.

 

Image source: arup.com

CCTV Headquarters in Beijing, China

This building is known for its bizarre and seemingly physically impossible form, but thanks to modern engineering and the brilliance of its creators, Rem Koolhaas and Ole Scheeren, it has become one of the greatest architectural marvels that the world has ever seen.

The engineers described it as a ‘three dimensional cranked loop’ because of its unusual shape. What’s amazing is that, the building is also designed to withstand earthquakes and stand strong in frequent seismic activities.

 


Neo-futurism: A response to modern architecture’s skeptical designs

Since the Industrial Revolution and the boom of 20th century technology, mankind has witnessed changes that our ancestors would and could have never imagined to ever exist neither in their lifetime nor in the millennia to come. What was once impossible has now become a reality, thanks to the continued quest to simply see beyond and outside the box.

 

Image source: fsmedia.imgix.net

 

Truly, many sectors and industries have benefited from the modern world’s innovative ideas as well as the ever developing technology, and the same story is true in the field of architecture—probably the single most important reason for the success (or failure) of many real estate and property development projects. Therefore, it plays a critical role in shaping up the business and the economy as a whole.

 

As a form of art that highlights a respect for structural and geometrical balance, it has expressed its own appreciation and genuine acceptance of what the modern world has to offer in the form of a “new” architectural style, neo-futurism.  Essentially, it is a late 20th century architectural style derived from high-tech architecture.  It combines concepts of urban design that utilize new materials and technologies. However, unlike its other modern counterparts, the style is more in touch with human emotions, promoting ethical values, and eco-sustainability.

 

Image source: londontopia.net

 

This is why neo-futurism is described as an idealistic and more optimistic take on the future. As a form of an avant-garde movement, it is as a departure from post-modernist’s skeptical and referential style in design. One of its goals is to rethink functionality and aesthetic in response to the rapidly developing urban areas.

 

Buckminster Fuller and other designers introduced this concept in the late 1960s and early 70s but rise of this art movement in modern architecture can be credited to prominent figures such as Zaha Hadid, Iraqi-British Pritzker Architecture Prize-winning architect, and the Spanish architect Santiago Calatrava.

 

Other famous neo-futurist figures are French architects Denis Laming, British artist Olivia Peake, urban-noise artist Joseph Young, and many more.


Super-cities: Skyscrapers of the future

The last two decades were perhaps history’s most ambitious period for architecture. Multi-billion development projects across the globe fuel massive construction booms, pushing design boundaries as well as boosting local or national economies. While the financial crisis of 2008 seemed to have discouraged many developers, building mega-projects—such as skyscrapers—did not stop companies from making history. In Dubai alone, dozens of innovative and groundbreaking structures rose above empty deserts like mushrooms and forever changed the emirate’s cityscape. In the next couple of years, several more revolutionary skyscrapers will hit news headlines. Some of them are as follows:

 

Jeddah Tower

When completed by the end of the decade, this Saudi super-structure will be the tallest skyscraper in the world. It will be more one kilometer tall and will be the centerpiece of a US$20 billion proposed development known as Jeddah Economic City. The project was designed by multi-awarded American architect Adrian Smith, who is also the genius behind the world’s current tallest building, the Burj Khalifa. Aesthetically, the structure will resemble desert plant shooting upwards, symbolizing Saudi Arabia’s growth and future.

 

Image source: stuff.co.nz

 

KL118

Consisting of 400,000 square meters (4,300,000 square feet) of residential and commercial space, KL118 will overtake the iconic Petronas Towers as Malaysia’s tallest structure when it opens in 2019. It is currently being constructed within the vicinity of a number of historic landmarks with little modern development.

 

Image source: skyrisecities.com

 

Hydropolis

An aquatic city found right next to a cosmopolitan desert boomtown, this mega-project will be a magnificent underwater hotel that will once again put Dubai on the map. When completed, the hotel will cover an area of 260 hectares, which is roughly the size of Hyde Park in London. The central structure of the Hydropolis is the Lemniscate, a symbol of wisdom. A unique aspect of the underwater building is that it will comprise of different structures that represent various parts of the human body.

 

Image source: charismaticplanet.com

 

Baoneng Shenyang Global Financial Center

Currently under construction in Shenyang, Liaoning, China, this supertall skyscraper is notable for its design emphasis on both simplicity and iconicity. It has conical extrusions at its base, resembling canopies or nomadic tent entrances common during the Qing Dynasty. At the top is a “pearl” that would symbolize the Chinese wisdom, luxury, and purity. Located on a high seismic zone, the tower was designed to withstand strong ground shaking.

 

Image source: allday.com

 

These structures are highly impressive in their own right and will go down in historic as architectural marvels. However, regardless of how ambitious a building plan looks, its economic, cultural, and environmental value must be of the greatest importance.  Man’s ingenuity must always be used for the greater good.